How kids can decrease hate by playing PlayStation

Inspiration from: https://www.forbes.com/sites/olliebarder/2018/05/23/sony-says-that-the-next-playstation-is-three-years-away/#6132c80e621b

PlayStation can benefit children with special needs in so many ways. Learning via play is an exciting and beautiful way children with special needs can learn and get motivated. Strengthening kid’s skills is an approach that has been proved to help them learn. PlayStation games can offer excellent opportunities for children with special needs. The kids get to practice social skills, communication skills and organization skills in a relaxed setting where the players determine the pace.  Whereas video games aimed mainly at kids with special needs tend to address specific issues, a lot of mainstream titles can back up your child’s learning. Mainstream games can help enhance a sense of confidence and independence in children with special needs, give them room to ask for assistance and challenge themselves.

Try out these video games to help kids with special needs in these areas;  Communication  These are games that promote social modelling, language patterns, and visual storytelling. These games help in speaking, listening, and communication.  •  Cool School, windows, Mac  Cool School is a free video game which helps the kids practice ways of solving conflicts.  •  Itzazoo, Windows  In this game “living ink” technology is used. Drawings done by kids are animated and incorporated into a unique read and write video game.  •  Storybook Workshop, Nintendo Wii  Kids playing this game take turns in reading aloud fairy tales, the game alters your voice to fit the particular scene.  Motor Skills  These are PlayStation games that encourage movement. These include sports, dancing, handwriting, and drawing. These games build up muscle memories.  •  Active life; Nintendo Wii, Magical Carnival  This game uses a standard Wii remote and a unique floor mat that tracks foot movement of the players. These games are fantasy themed, and they test the kid’s short-term memory, their ability to follow simple instructions quickly and their skills in matching patterns, colours, and pictures.  •  Disney Fantasia; Music Evolved, Xbox One  Disney Fantasia is a music video game, and it teaches kids about music, sound rhythms, and also provides physical exercise for the kids.  •  Letter School; iPhone, IPad  Letter School PlayStation games aids in teaching kids letter writing. Letter writing is taught in three processes. First, you learn the starting point of each stroke, the second letter tracing where you trace the letter, thirdly you write the letter without any suggestions. Once you are done with drawing the letter, it becomes animated, a nice reward for any kid.  Reading and Writing  These are games that give both written and verbal instructions. They mostly focus on the player’s strong point, and they can help in boosting reading and writing skills.  •  Mia Reading: Windows, Mac  Mia reading games have 12 learning activities for kids and 4 levels that are difficult. Mia reading takes kids on a roller coaster of adventure that entails a massive range of literacy basis, as well as relating words with images, spelling, phonics and sentence structure.  •  Scribblenauts Unlimited  In this game, kids learn how to solve puzzles. The kids also get the chance to exercise their vocabularies and even expand their imagination in this game puzzle.  Whereas PlayStation games can be misused, they can also be of great help to children with special needs. The kids get to exercise their muscle, learn writing, reading, and speaking and also improve their social skills. Parents should encourage and motivate their kids who have special needs in playing some of these cool and educative video games.

You can learn more about this at: https://PSNhero.com

Two Books That Will Inspire You to Travel to Bhutan

Bhutan

There are places that will change the way you view things and perhaps even transform your life. And a country located at the edges of the Himalayas is one of them. Awe-inspiring, eye-opening, and mesmerizing are just some of the things that will describe a Bhutan vacation. The Buddhist kingdom puts a premium on Gross National Happiness (GNH) and its role in development. The country also boasts of pristine environment and is the only carbon negative nation in the world. Not to mention its breathtaking scenery and inspiring way of life. If you have not been to Bhutan and thinking of going there someday, here are some great reads about the kingdom that will make you want to book a ticket now.

1. A Splendid Isolation: Lessons on Happiness from the Kingdom of Bhutan by Madeline Drexler
Author Madeline Drexler delves into Bhutan’s happiness as a social policy and provides a fascinating glimpse into its culture and way of life. If you love to travel or interested in topics like Buddhism and happiness, this book is a delightful, informative, and thought-provoking read.

2. Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan by Jamie Zeppa
Beyond the Sky and the Earth is a memoir that tells the story of the author’s time spent in a village in the Himalayan kingdom. It captures the culture and the spirit behind the traditions and customs that are still very much alive in the country. Whether you are thinking of traveling to Bhutan or just want to know more about it, this travel memoir will take you on a journey into the heart of the country.

8 of the Best Movies on Racism and Prejudice That Are Worth Watching

A lot of social injustices are rooted in bigotry and prejudice. Racism continues to haunt many people around the world. Even the most multicultural cities have its share of haters and racists. While respect and tolerance may take some time to take root in some places, there are ways to encourage discussion on diversity and how to fight bigotry. Here are some of the best movies that touch on racism and on confronting prejudice.

A Family Thing (1996)

Highlights: One death lead to a striking discovery between two families, a story of one white southerner and a black man discovering that they are brothers

Bend It Like Beckham (2002)

Highlights: A story of an Indian Sikh girl who dreams of making it to a top women’s football team, a glimpse into the challenges that inter-family and cultural differences present

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967)

Highlights: A film depicting the challenges of interracial relationships and how two liberal parents from the upper class deal with their daughter’s relationship with a talented and accomplished black man

Hotel Rwanda (2004)

Highlights: Based on a true story that that unfolded during the 1994 civil war in Rwanda, a story that touches on man’s inhumanity to man and hope

Mississippi Burning (1988)

Highlights: A film about two FBI agents out to investigate the murders of three civil rights workers in 1964, a glimpse into a time when segregation was still in place and the atmosphere it creates in a Southern town

Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002)

Highlights: Based on a true story on how a policy of separating children of mixed-race families from their mother affected the lives of three girls

Sugihara: Conspiracy of Kindness (2000)

Highlights: The inspiring and heartwarming documentary of Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara who issued fake visas thus helping save thousands of Jews during World War II

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Highlights: Set in 1930s Alabama, this film adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel of the same title tells a story of widower and lawyer Atticus Finch as he takes on the case of a black man who was accused of raping a farmer’s daughter

5 of the Most Multicultural Cities in the World

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” – Mark Twain

Exposure to diverse cultures may not be a magical solution to eliminate hate and prejudice in the world, but it does its share of work in changing perceptions. Travel is a great way to immerse in local culture and interact with people who may live by different beliefs and practices. While many countries have one cultural identity that stand out, there are ethnically diverse societies across the globe where different cultures co-exist. Here are some of the most multicultural cities in the world that can give you a glimpse of how diversity can be a platform in promoting respect and tolerance.

Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Amsterdam
The city has long been associated with tolerance. It is one of Europe’s most culturally diverse cities with 180 different nationalities. Amsterdam not only welcomes people from different cultures and ethnic backgrounds. It also has anti-discriminatory policies in place including not just those aimed in protecting ethnic minorities but also the LGBT community.

Dubai, UAE
Dubai
The population of Dubai is made up of roughly less than 17% Emiratis with the rest comprising of expatriates from many countries around the world. Many of the city’s workers come from Bangladesh, China, Egypt, India, Iran, Nepal, Pakistan, and the Philippines. Other countries with citizens living in Dubai include Australia, Canada, France, South Africa, UK, and the US.

London, UK
London
Roughly more than 3 million people living in London are born outside the country. The top five countries of birth of some of London’s residents are India, Poland, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Ireland. Many other countries make up the list including Nigeria, Romania, Sri Lanka, Italy, France, and Jamaica to name a few. As a culturally diverse city, London is a melting pot of cultures that come with more than 200 spoken languages all together.

Los Angeles, USA
Los Angeles
Los Angeles is home to a population mostly coming from approximately 140 countries. Close to a hundred languages are spoken on a day to day basic in this city. Neighborhoods like Chinatown, Historic Filipinotown, Koreatown, Little Bangladesh, Little Tokyo, and more provide a glimpse into the unique and diverse nature of its cultural landscape.

Toronto, Canada
Toronto
Toronto is home to 200 ethnic groups living. And there are more than 140 languages spoken in the city. Countries with people living in Toronto include China, Ireland, Italy, Nepal, the Netherlands, and UK among many others. Some of the neighborhoods that showcase the city’s multicultural diversity include Chinatown, Little Italy, and Little India among others.